Ideas 4 life, part 3

Went the other day to check my custom made kimono

The shop owner holding my Haori (Jacket)
The shop owner holding my Haori (Jacket)
Detail of the design inside the Haori
Detail of the design inside the Haori

 

The bag I'm holding have dragonflies printed all over, and is made by deer leather
The bag I’m holding have dragonflies printed all over, and is made by deer leather
The Obi (sash or belt) holding the Kimono
The Obi (sash or belt) holding the Kimono
Zori (Sandals) have turtle shell motif on the belt
Zori (Sandals) have turtle shell motif on the belt

As you noted, there’s details in every piece. The print inside the Haori jacket shows a woman coming out of the sea. She’s a fisher and picks oysters almost naked. The half naked woman is not the main thing here actually, but is the oyster. Because the shape kinda reminds the female genitalia. So, the drawing is printed inside the jacket purposely. It is a “hidden adornment”, only slightly visible when the wearer strips off his jacket. And a “hidden meaning” behind the drawing.
The hidden adornment on clothes, was very common in the Edo period and it influenced the Japanese tattoo, in terms of body placement. Because laws were strict, even controlling “dress codes”. Fancy and bright Kimonos were not allowed. Commoners found their way to have those charming prints hidden from the authorities, and it was considered even more stylish.
That’s one of the reasons Japanese tattoos does put a weight on the back piece designs. Not the arms for example, it would be more visible at that time (specially wearing Kimonos) and could bring trouble to the tattooed person (Tattoos were forbidden by law).

The dragonflies on the bag, do symbolize lucky. Lucky on gambling for example. Because the samurais did ornamented their helmets and clothes with this insect. The dragonfly never flies backwards, so the samurais did believed they symbolized bravery, as they never backed down in the battlefield. So, years later in times of peace of the Edo period; commoners started to use the symbol as a lucky charm when they did gamble for example.

The turtle shell design on the Zori sandals, come from the proverb: “Crane lives thousand years, turtle lives hundred”. It symbolizes longevity, and both animals are considered lucky symbols as well.

Once again, inspiration can always be found in the daily life.

たまには着物でも。。。なんて気楽には呉服屋さんに入るのすらためらうでしょう。僕も勇気をしぼって行ってみました (笑
初めてにも関わらず、すごく親切に色々と見せていただいて、そして何よりも着こなしだけではなく、小物選びやその絵柄、文様の説明一つ一つに発見と驚きの連続。
トンボ柄、亀甲文様、羽織の中に隠し絵等遊び心とそれぞれ意味があって皆様にぜひ調べていただきたい。タトゥーの柄選びにも絶対参考になります。

何よりも着物を実際着てみると最初は”不便”と思ったのは確かだ。先ず、歩く小幅が狭まるし(タイトなロングスカートの用?)、階段の上り下りがメチャめんどくさい。
しかし、不思議に”急がずに歩こう”と思ってくる(というよりそうせざる負えない)。そうする事によって、自然に時間の流れも変わり、見る景色も変わってくる。

今回は着物との発見で何度か耳にした”粋”という言葉。呉服屋の女将さんを始め、街で声をかけてくれた人、皆必ず一回は会話の中でその言葉が出てくる。
何かまだ着物デビュー仕立ての自分にはその意味がサッパリ解りません。。。
本当に”粋”なライフスタイルとは何か?着物を通してまた一つチャレンジが出来ました。

Published by

Carlos aus Tokyo

International player, attitude holder, tattooist of the masses. ロス、リオ, 東京, アムス、アントワープ、リエージュ、ドルトムンド、ケルンと世界を渡り、彫り歩く。タトゥーはその土地土地の空気を表す手段という解釈で今日も胸いっぱい彫ります