Tattoo and Race

When do we talk the word “race”, it surely brings some heat into the topic itself. This word just came out in my head not for some sort of accident, but it came out naturally and I couldn’t find another one to replace it for this blog.

Being part of a tattoo convention means that you are exposing your work to another’s eyes. Is a great opportunity to share, so to speak your style or thoughts to the locals.
Obviously, the tone of a convention should be an international one preferably, and if your are coming from abroad, automatically you are expected to represent your cultural background through tattooing.
Sometimes people do expect the typical distorted image of a certain race or country.
Hence, the Japanese dressed on a kimono or some sort of outfit and so on.

Anyone living in the country itself do knows that in Japan we do not do wear daily a kimono.
So does not a German guy wears a leather horsen or so on.

But again, people are too accommodate to do a little research and find out the truth. And then comes the problem when the people from those countries itself do feel accommodate to put themselves in that image, frame themselves into the ridiculous and artificial.

Thank God, I am pretty secure and sure of what do I represent and present to others. It is all about mixing styles, but not adding or taking anything out of it. Just transforming them into a readable self tough.
That’s what makes a tattoo, independent of race, is a independent man.






Published by

Carlos aus Tokyo

International player, attitude holder, tattooist of the masses. ロス、リオ, 東京, アムス、アントワープ、リエージュ、ドルトムンド、ケルンと世界を渡り、彫り歩く。タトゥーはその土地土地の空気を表す手段という解釈で今日も胸いっぱい彫ります